Nocturne

PHOTO PROMPT © Dale Rogerson

Last night, outside my bedroom window

the rain serenaded

a pitter patter lullaby to wash the day away

while I waited for gutter music

my favorite nocturne

when raindrops slide down, down, down

the roof

like children on a playground

each little raindrop

meandering along a metal path until

it plinks like a hundred tiny triangles

crescendos

and brings dreams of childhood

when I first listened to the rain

outside my bedroom window

twenty thousand nights later

I wake to sunshine

and think, “Life is good.”

THE END
86 Words

Thanks for the photo prompt, Dale Rogerson! I zoomed in straight to the gutter, which brought back memories of listening to the rain when I was a little girl. 🙂

Friday Fictioneers is a compilation of writers from around the world who gather online weekly, guided by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The challenge? To write a story in 100 words or less based on a new photo prompt. 

To read more stories in an online flash fiction anthology by Friday Fictioneer authors, click:

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Posted in fictioneers, Flash Fiction, nostalgia | Tagged , , , , | 24 Comments

Caged Bird

PHOTO PROMPT © Liz Young

Drats! Mother told me to remove the wheels before locking the cage, my sanctuary from the crime scene of a world where fellow zombies threaten to eat anyone who’s different.

Did I listen? Noooo.

But, I’m not like the rest of them! And now, I’ve rolled away from my briefcase—where I hid the key.

So, now what?

I’ll sing! Because Wes Craven once said, “If I’m going to be a caged bird, I’ll sing the best song I can.”

It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood . . . won’t you be my neighbor?

Because we’re all caged birds.

THE END
100 Words

Friday Fictioneers is a compilation of writers from around the world who gather online weekly, guided by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The challenge? To write a story in 100 words or less based on a new photo prompt. 

To read more stories in an online flash fiction anthology by Friday Fictioneer authors, click:

Posted in fictioneers, Flash Fiction | Tagged , , , , , | 46 Comments

Writer’s Block

PHOTO PROMPT © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

writer’s block

noun

  1. a usually temporary condition in which a writer finds it impossible to proceed with writing a story, novel, play, etc.

I’ve experienced the miserable frozen stare at a blank screen, the write and re-write of the same sentence a dozen times. Therefore, I’ve researched and found myriad ways one might overcome it:

Hemingway says, “Stop when the going is good.”

Morrill says, “Talk to your characters.” 🙂

Wisoff-Fields says, “Ask your husband to compose a soundtrack for your story.”

It’s been almost two years since I’ve written one word on my sequel. Perhaps I’ll try all three.

THE END
100 Words

I hope you’ll forgive putting myself on a list with great writers such as Hemingway and Wisoff-Fields. But one can dream, right? 🙂

Friday Fictioneers is a compilation of writers from around the world who gather online weekly, guided by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The challenge? To write a story in 100 words or less based on a new photo prompt. 

To read more stories in an online flash fiction anthology by Friday Fictioneer authors, click:

Posted in Flash Fiction, writing | Tagged , , , | 43 Comments

Orchestra

PHOTO PROMPT © Fatima Fakier Deria

Last night the boy dreamed of two boats. One arrived filled with hot dogs and ice cream and even boxes and boxes of Tootsie Roll Pops—his favorite. The other boat arrived with toys he’d seen on TV – Xboxes, Legos, Play-Doh.

The street was empty and silence rang in his ears. He approached the boats to look closer, hoping to find the only thing he really wanted.

“Papa? Did you come for me?”

The man on the boat turned.

He woke from his dream,  an orchestra of cries surrounding him.

I want Mama!

Where is my Papa?

THE END
99 Words

Please click HERE to read about the similarities I see to another period in our history when we used “camps” for “security” purposes — a period when, as a child, my own mother was placed behind barbed wire. But, at least she was permitted to stay with her parents.

 

 

 

 

Friday Fictioneers is a compilation of writers from around the world who gather online weekly, guided by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The challenge? To write a story in 100 words or less based on a new photo prompt. 

To read more stories in an online flash fiction anthology by Friday Fictioneer authors, click:

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | 34 Comments

Inhumanity

(John Moore/Getty Images)

I don’t care if you’re a Republican or a Democrat. If you’re a Trump supporter or not. I don’t care what you think about immigration reform, or whether you believe in God or are an atheist.

If you’re a human being, you cannot possibly think separating a child from his/her parent is humane.

Humanity: All human beings collectively. Whether immigrant or American. The human race.

If America’s policies are not humane, then we as a country are inhumane.

When the stories of these separations first began to hit the news cycle, I’ll admit, my first thought was one of denial. Perhaps the media was sensationalizing the claim. I did not want to believe this was happening in America. I didn’t want to believe the GOP had slid so far down the slippery slope of their desire to retain control. (I’m a life-long Republican.)

So, I continued to listen and read a variety of news sources about “tent cities,” camps and an empty Walmart housing the children, while both Trump and Sessions rationalized the “zero tolerance” policy as a deterrent to illegal immigrants.

Mural of President Trump at Casa Padre, formerly Walmart. (image courtesy US Department of Health and Human Services)

“If people don’t want to be separated from their children, they should not bring them with them. We’ve got to get this message out. You’re not given immunity.” ~~Jeff Sessions

Two things happened, and I could stay silent no longer.

1. The Photo

The little girl in the photo above is about the age of my granddaughter, Allie. I couldn’t help but think about my own grandkids being taken from their parents. Allie needs her mommy. It wouldn’t matter if she was taken to a park, a toy store or even Disneyland. When she’s sad, hurt or especially frightened, she wants her mommy. Period.

How can anyone, especially a parent, try to make the separation sound harmless by reasoning the children are being “well cared for” and have a clean environment, healthy meals and plenty of toys?

When Dr. Colleen Kraft, head of the American Academy of Pediatrics, entered a facility, she found a “little playground where children could play. Rooms were equipped with toys, books and crayons.”

She noticed a 2-year old girl crying and pounding her fists on a mat. Dr. Kraft said, “The really devastating thing was that we all knew what was going on with this child. We all knew what the problem was. She didn’t have her mother, and none of us can fix that.”

Read more here: “America is better than this”: What a doctor saw in a Texas shelter for migrant children

2. Propaganda

The comments excuses BS spouting from the mouths of those trying to soothe concerns about taking children away from their parents began to remind me of the propaganda used during the internment of people of Japanese ancestry during World War II. (If you aren’t familiar with my family’s history, my mother was interned at the age of eight.)

The following statements are almost identical to the justification used to intern my mother, her family and 120,000 others of Japanese ancestry–2/3 of them American citizens.

  • It’s for the security of our nation.
  • It’s in their best interest.
  • They’re being kept in a clean, safe environment.

If you don’t want to watch the whole video, jump to around minute 5:00. It might surprise you to hear how similar the propaganda sounds to what’s being said today.

Remember the biblical quote Jeff Sessions recently used to justify this “zero tolerance” policy:

“I would cite you to the Apostle Paul and his clear and wise command in Romans 13 to obey the laws of the government because God has ordained them for the purpose of order.”

And here’s a quote from the end of the video about the Japanese Internment:

” . . .we are protecting ourselves without violating the principles of Christian decency . . .”

Now, here’s Romans 13:10, which AG Sessions failed to mention:

Love does no wrong to a neighbor; therefore love is the fulfillment of the law.

We may disagree on our politics. We may disagree on our religion. We may disagree on how immigration should be fixed. We may disagree on what the biggest security risk is to our country.

But I believe, if we really think about it . . . if we stop for a moment and empathize with those immigrant parents, or at least with those children, how can any of us think separating children from their parents is humane?

And if you agree it’s inhumane, how can you remain silent?

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