Boycotting Facebook

For some time now, I’ve been considering boycotting, perhaps leaving Facebook all together. I’ve seen other people on Facebook threaten to do the same.

So, just as I did for Lent, I’m logging off and removing the app from my phone. After a time, my goal is to deactivate my account completely.

Here are my reasons:

  1. What was once an excellent place to gather online and get to know people has become an artificial and tribal place where more and more, it’s not okay to think differently.
  2. I’ve learned that it’s not the place to hold a discussion with those who think differently from me. Though I have friends with whom I differ, and the discussion is often respectful, it’s obvious that neither “side” is listening to the other. Instead, we each recite the sound bytes of whatever media we follow. Also, other people commenting on the thread often comment in a negative, unproductive manner.
  3. Fake news and fake memes continue to appear, and friends and family continue to share them. One simple Google search almost always proves it’s false, so it’s obvious few people are verifying before sharing.
  4. I spend way too much time on Facebook, mostly perusing and keeping up with what’s going on with friends and family. This is also one of the things that makes it hardest to quit. It’s a fantastic way to keep in touch with a lot of different people. But, it’s a major, major time suck.

But, here’s the straw that broke the camel’s back:

Facebook Policy Lets Politicians Lie in Ads

You may think, “All politicians lie in their ads.”

That’s true, and it happens on both sides. But, I agree with what the Washington Post says in the article:

Deception is hardly new to politics, and candidates have run ads inflating their records and trashing their opponents on television and radio for years. But those falsehoods now, in the age of social media, can go viral in a matter of minutes, reaching millions of people around the world.

We all saw it happen with the fake memes from the last election. And now, Facebook is allowing the politicians themselves to lie. I don’t want to see it, and I certainly don’t want to participate in it.

Next, you may say “It would be impossible for Facebook to catch every lie.”

Perhaps that’s true. But therein lies the very problem with Facebook. It’s gotten too big. Nobody can agree on how much posts should be monitored, what’s considered free speech, etc.

But again, that doesn’t mean I have to see it or participate in it.

No doubt, I’ll miss so easily staying up-to-date with what’s going on in the lives of friends and family. But I hope to be more active on my blog with my own updates and certainly my opinions about life, politics, etc. I always welcome your comments, and I hope my friends will stay in touch with me outside of Facebook.

There are times I feel helpless to do anything about the state of our country these days. Frankly, I don’t see how Facebook helps, and in fact, from what I’ve seen recently, I believe it’s done more damage than good. So, a boycott (and perhaps, an ultimate deactivation) is one small way I feel I’m doing something.

So long, Facebook.

This entry was posted in facebook, social media and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Boycotting Facebook

  1. Anonymous says:

    Hi Jan, I’ve been contemplating the same thing for weeks. Here I sit, when I should be editing my work and I’m sitting with my phone in hand. The lunch table at work is full, people I enjoy, and everyone is on their phone. If I sit elsewhere with a book I hear “You dont want to eat with us!” I’m unhappy with family member posting and the phrase ” you didn’t ‘like’ my post.” It has become exasperating. I understand.
    Wish I could see you more, I miss all of you Sisters.
    Sincerely, Julie

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jan Morrill says:

      I hear comments like yours everywhere, Julie. I think social media and our “smart” phones have damaged us as a society. And, even six years after moving to Dallas, I still miss you and my Fayetteville friends. Maybe the fact that we won’t see each other as much on FB will draw us together more. Love you!

      Like

      • I only get on Facebook about once a week, then I slide right over the political comments. Politics is a lot like religion–once people make up their minds on something you’re not going to change them and they are not interested in considering another POV. In fact, many of them get angry if you suggest an idea that doesn’t align with their beliefs. Also, people are much bolder on social media and would type things they’d never say to your face.

        Perhaps they should change the name from Facebook to Behind-Your-Back-Book. 🙂

        Like

  2. colorrealty says:

    I feel your pain, but I have friends from all over the world that I keep up with on FB.
    The internet has been both the greatest thing to share knowledge, as well as one of the causes of polarization in our country, and the world. Let’s hope we figure it out, before it’s too late.

    Like

  3. Lisa Marotta says:

    Hi Jan! I have done 2 Facebook fasts and keep returning despite my better judgement. I think the logarithm has addiction embedded into the code. That being said, I will miss the pictures of you and your beautiful growing-up family. I enjoy your blog and look forward to more creativity from you. Best of luck on your boycott! ❤️ Lisa Marotta

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    Like

  4. Anonymous says:

    I can’t because FB is the best place where I can encourage and inspire. However, I am going to deactivate Twitter. I can’t think of a meaner social media than Twitter. People there are brutal! The majority of what I see is either tweets complaining or trying to sell me something! Soooo, goodbye Twitter! 😉

    Like

Join the conversation!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s