Farewell, My Boy

PHOTO PROMPT © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Farewell, My Boy

Don’t be sad for me
even as you see my scattered remnants.
Mine was a bountiful life.
From the day I first peeked from moist earth
and found sunshine
to the day I survived the clearing
of trees in my grove
and stood alone.
I reached higher, higher
toward a blue sky
until my loneliness ended
when a little boy arrived to
climb my limbs each day
and listened to secrets I whispered.
Today, My Boy is a man
who needs warmth more than secrets
I’ll burn brightly, crackle, “Farewell, My Boy,”
As I reach for the sky once more.

THE END

Friday Fictioneers is a compilation of writers from around the world who gather online weekly, guided by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The challenge? To write a story in 100 words or less based on a new photo prompt.

To read more stories in an online flash fiction anthology by Friday Fictioneer authors, click: 

Thank you for the photo prompt, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. Your photo made me happy and sad all at once, as I remembered climbing trees, playing in my grandmother’s field, chopping wood and sitting in front of a warm fire, listening to the crackle of a tree that once was.

This entry was posted in fictioneers, Flash Fiction, nostalgia and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

29 Responses to Farewell, My Boy

  1. Iain Kelly says:

    Lovely scene – I can picture the boy and the tree and their bond.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Dear Jan,

    Why does this put me in mind of Puff the Magic Dragon? I love this poem from the POV of the tree. These anthropomorphic stories don’t often work for me. This one does and fires on all cylinders. (How am I doing for halfway through my first cuppa?) To put it succinctly…well done!

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Moon says:

    So truly beautiful!
    Without the photo, this could also read like a mother’s farewell words to her child.
    Wonderful take on the picture prompt, Jan.

    Like

    • Moon says:

      I read my comment again and now feel so foolish about the Mother reference. I wonder what I was thinking while type. Sorry, Jan.
      Read the poem again and it’s really really beautiful.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Jan Vanek says:

        No worries, Moon! I rather like that your first interpretation was that of a mother. Appropriate, because isn’t it true that mothers often gladly sacrifice all for the love of her child? Thank you!

        Like

  4. A tree with happy memories. Simply delightful Jan.

    Click to read my FriFic!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Reminds me a bit of The Giving Tree. Nicely done.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Anna Rymer says:

      Ah that was it – I was trying to place what it reminded me of! It’s such a beautiful concept – the changing relationship of the boy and the tree – how each meets the other’s needs. This poem captures it so eloquently.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jan Vanek says:

      Thank you, Josh. I never thought about it, but perhaps it’s because of The Giving Tree I have such empathy for trees and what they’ve seen. And that reminds me–I need to get that book to read to my grandkids when they’re a little older.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. James says:

    That is very sad. Reminds me of both “The Giving Tree” by Shel Silverstein and “Puff the Magic Dragon” written by Leonard Lipton and Peter Yarrow, and famously performed by Peter, Paul, and Mary in 1963.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jan Vanek says:

      Thank you, James. I didn’t think of either “The Giving Tree” or “Puff the Magic Dragon” when I wrote this, or when I feel sad when I see a fallen tree, though based on comments here, I’ve clearly been influenced by their themes that must have remained inside me when they were planted by these stories in my younger days. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I like that the tree harbours no malice towards the boy. I’m not sure I’d be so forgiving, in its place.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. pennygadd51 says:

    I like your poem a lot. The tree articulates a humane vision of life even as the human has cut it down and is preparing to burn it. I don’t think I shall ever feel quite the same about log-burning stoves…
    It’s a beautiful poem, full of acceptance.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Dale says:

    That was a most beautiful poem. It feels familiar but I cannot say why…

    Liked by 1 person

  10. michael1148humphris says:

    I did like this poem, but it felt as if the tree may have become sad from being alone.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. truthsbyruth says:

    holy crap! this made me tear-up. Good one, Jan! One of your best.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. rgayer55 says:

    Well done, Jan. I’ve often thought that a tree would rather be used for firewood rather than just lay on the ground and rot. Serving a useful purpose make a life complete.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. granonine says:

    How lovely. Loved the POV from the tree.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Trees can become so much… yet it feels a bit sad that men needs more than little boys…

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Such a lovely piece! I hope the man gives thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. What a beautiful depiction of a tree’s POV

    Liked by 1 person

  17. I love the relationship between the tree and the boy/man. A beautiful poem.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Jelli says:

    I really enjoyed that little story. Just beautiful in its flow and simplicity.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Love the story…I like the idea of brightly crackling…in my case it will probable be cackle. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

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