#FlashFriday #FridayFictioneers: Precious Delusion

Between my Internet being down and my mini-vacation in the Land of Enchantment (that would be Santa Fe, NM), I’ve missed the Friday Fictioneers! But, I’m happy to be back this week, and can’t wait to read the other stories (click here and you can read them, too!) inspired by Madison Woods‘s photograph.:

Precious Delusion

     Perhaps you’ve heard of “little man complex.” Sadly, Precious, my little French Poodle, suffered from a terminal case of “little dog complex.”

    I remember my little foofoo barking wildly, her rhinestone collar glittering, even in the dull sunlight of that foggy afternoon. Her fatal delusion was the distraction I needed to get away. Still, I’m haunted by her tiny yelp as she was thrown against the rock where she now rests.
     So, I come to visit her, even a dozen years after her grizzly death. Yes, it was grizzly–as in bear–that brought her untimely end.
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34 Responses to #FlashFriday #FridayFictioneers: Precious Delusion

  1. Russell says:

    What a great title. My neighbors have a couple “ankle biters” with “little dog complex.” There are times I'd like to find a grizzly to feed them to. Great use of the prompt. I assume Ed's comment means “rest in peace?”

    here's mine http://russellgayer.blogspot.com/

  2. Jan Morrill says:

    Rest in Peace? I'm surprised, ed_quixote. I would have thought you'd say “good riddance.” 🙂

  3. Jan Morrill says:

    Thanks, Russell. Loved yours, too. Wow . . . who would have thought pole dancing could come from that picture of bones. How very creative!

  4. Judee says:

    Poor precious. What is it about small dogs that makes them think they can take on much bigger foes? Creative use of the prompt.

  5. elmowrites says:

    Poor Precious, but she did what she intended and saved her master, so in the end I guess she kind of won.

    Mine is here:
    http://elmowrites.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/friday-fiction-14/

  6. It's nice to have you back…while you were away I welcome initiated into this gang….

    I pity for your foofoo, though…she must have tried to save you.

    Here's a link to , mine.
    http://seewilliams.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/moriah/

  7. Janet says:

    Such an interesting interpration of the photo prompt. Loved the story, especially the title, so perfect. Here's mine: http://postcardfiction.com/2012/02/24/forgotten/

  8. carlos says:

    What a take on the photo! Hah! I had a dog that disappeared during bear season, but he was 16 years old and a Pit Bull, not a Toy Poodle. And in all likelihood was killed by the bear hunters' huge packs of dogs, and not the bear.
    Bear hunting in California is a repellent “sport” in which packs of 30 or so dogs with radio collars roam the woods looking for bear. When they tree one, the hunters see that the dot on the screen isn't moving, so they leave camp, probably drunk, to find the dogs and shoot the bear out of the tree. Even the local rednecks don't like the bear hunters.

  9. Beth says:

    Wow. Strange to read this from a dog lover. Great story and interpretation. Love the title and name of the dog, too.

    I can't play today. I have a book signing tonight and also tomorrow at the KGBX Women's Show. I should be making signs and loading my car now. Have fun, everyone and welcome back, Jan!

    http://www.banterwithbeth.blogspot.com (last week's prompt in case you missed it)

  10. Susan Wenzel says:

    We call them “yappy dogs.” Haha…I know what you mean. It's the little guys that have the big heart. Sad end for “foofoo.” I'd like to think she died protecting her owner from the bear.

    ~Susan (Here's mine: http://www.susanwenzel.com/)

  11. Jack LaBloom says:

    After reading the story I had visions of Precious attacking the bear, in an effort to save you.

    Good story. It brought back a childhood memory of our first dog.

  12. I dislike little (yip yip) dogs so very much, but this story tugged at my heart. The crazy little beasts, like any dog, really would die to protect their owners.

    http://www.wakefieldmahon.com/1/post/2012/02/dem-bones-friday-fictioneers.html

  13. Jan Morrill says:

    Thank you, Judee. It's one of the appeals to a smaller dog — that they are so brave, despite their size!

  14. Jan Morrill says:

    You're exactly right, elmowrites. The little foofoo saved her master and in the end, she won. Loved your tale of childhood innocence!

  15. Maggie says:

    Chuckle, chuckle. Sorry that Precious met such a grizzly end. 😉

  16. Linda Palund says:

    Oh such and enchantingly told tale – the rhinestone collar was a terrific touch. That you were able to get away – and thus were saved by the misguided hero is so bittersweet against the poor creatures horrific demise!
    Great story…

  17. Great story, Jan. I loved the set up and the almost idle sorrow over FooFoo's demise. Nicely done. 🙂

    Here's mine:
    http://siobhanmuir.blogspot.com/2012/02/cave-100words-for-fridayfictioneers-and.html

    Siobhan

  18. Loved the double meaning of grizzly in the closing line. Animal stories always have a very basic attraction for many people, I believe. BTW, read your story X's and O's and was very impressed with your gifted writing and I'm so proud of you for writing a beautiful story that sheds light on this subject matter. Heartfelt congrats!
    Here's mine: http://bridgesareforburning.wordpress.com/

  19. Quill Shiv says:

    Grizzly, as in the bear. I'm sad to say, I laughed. …I'm a bad person. But I did feel bad for foofoo.

    My link is: http://quillshiv.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/let-flow-what-is-left/

  20. Palooski65 says:

    Jan, I loved your Foofoo–what a gallant heart. I did sigh a sigh of relief that the narrator escaped — after all, a grizzly has to do what a grizzly has to do! I liked the play on words.

    Mine: http://vsta.pr/zxAJ1y

  21. Dear Jan,

    Precious Delusion was a marvelous story. Dogs don't seem to know thry're little, do they? What spirit they have. You captured love, longing, courage and more in your short piece.

    I loved the play on 'Grizzly' too. Very good there.

    Aloha,

    Doug

  22. Robin Hawke says:

    Gallant, indeed!

    One note: consider deleting the word fatal–it might strengthen the alliteration.

    Robin

  23. Jan Morrill says:

    Thank you, Charles. Welcome to the Fictioneers. I enjoyed your story — very powerful and haunting.

  24. Jan Morrill says:

    Welcome to the Fictioneers, Janet. Your story made me very curious to know more! Thanks for your comment!

  25. Jan Morrill says:

    Very interesting story, Carlos! The grizzly was a bad guy in my story, but reading yours, I kind of felt sorry for them! We have them out here where I live. Though I've never seen one, my husband has.

  26. Jan Morrill says:

    You're right, Beth. But I thought I'd try my hand at dark humor. We missed you in the world of Fictioneers. Hope the weekend goes well for you!

    I'll head over to read your story from last week.

  27. Madison Woods says:

    Poor little foofoo. You know Jan, as we get deeper and deeper into our psyche's with this fictioneering gig, I'm seeing sides of you I didn't know existed 😉 So much fun!

  28. Jan Morrill says:

    Ah, yes, Susan. She was a mighty protector, even for her tiny size. 🙂 Loved your story. It's great that you let your creativity stretch beyond what you first see.

  29. Jan Morrill says:

    Oh, no, Jack. I hope you didn't lose your first dog that way. Dogs are so loyal — that's why I love them.

  30. Jan Morrill says:

    I don't particularly like yappy dogs either, Wakefield. But, it's true, they're every bit as loyal as their bigger counterparts. I enjoyed your apocalyptic story, too!

  31. Jan Morrill says:

    Thanks, Maggie. Poor little Precious.

  32. The Lime says:

    Oh wow, lady. This is great. I love the introduction by way of comparison and I love the narrator who comes back to the place where the poodle became grizzly prey. Just really smooth. Lovely work, as usual!

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